Pastoral Care⤴

from

Last night I took part in a fantastic pastoral chat session with Jill Berry via UKPastoral Chat.

We were debating various matters pastoral, both in relation to pupils and staff.

I said that I feel that a different model of pastoral support and staff training is needed, if we are to move forward in terms of education and provide genuinely supportive education.

In fact, on reflection, I don’t think that what we need is new, since much of it is going on already, some of it in our own schools and some of it elsewhere.

Many school leaders and politicians would benefit from reading this when considering what we want our interactions with children to be like:
https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/oct/17/school-pupil-referral-unit-welcome-bullied-excluded

I also wrote this over a year back and still hold that the 10 questions need to be asked by anyone who chooses (and please remember that it is a choice) to take on the responsibility and privilege of shaping young lives:

10 questions that you need to answer ‘yes’ to if you want to be a teacher/stay in teaching.

1. Do you like children and are you able to love each one as if they were related to you?
2. Do you like hard work?
3. Do you like working in a team of adults?
4. Are you self-aware and self-reflective?
5. Do you understand your own behaviour and its impact on others?
6. Do you genuinely value inclusion and equity?
7. Are you able to see beyond fads and trends and stay committed to your values and evidence based research?
8. Do you understand that the long holidays are not really all holidays? See here for more excellent reflection on this: http://www.teachertoolkit.me/2015/08/02/what-do-teachers-do-for-the-summer/
9. If you have never worked outside of education, are you willing to work hard to research and understand other ways of being?
10. Are you able to say sorry?

And this post that I wrote last week is pertinent to some of the issues raised last night:

https://lenabellina.wordpress.com/2017/10/13/what-are-we-about/

I believe above all that a commitment to caring and to allowing the time and space to give pupils individual attention are absolutely crucial, if our schools are to be genuinely nurturing.

Our Scottish Curriculum for excellence recognises the need for personal support:

“Children and young people are entitled to personal support to enable them to
* review their learning and plan for next steps
* gain access to learning activities which will meet their needs
* plan for opportunities for personal achievement
* prepare for changes and choices and be supported through changes and choices
All children and young people should have frequent and regular opportunities to discuss their learning with an adult who knows them well and can act as a mentor, helping them to set appropriate goals for the next stages in learning. This provides opportunities to challenge young people’s choices, which may be based on stereotypes. Young people themselves should be at the centre of this planning, as active participants in their learning and development.”

Yes, we are teachers of subjects and specialisms in secondary education but we are also teachers of children and role models in how to live. We should all be able to provide personal support to children.

As a valued colleague Mandy Davidson noted as part of the debate on Twitter this morning, “My concern of separate path is that others may then see pupils as “not my area, I am subject specialist”.

As teachers, we all have to be prepared to be specialists in educating children and in providing children with the time and space to find solutions to the challenges that they face. We have to give unconditional positive regard to all the children we encounter and want the absolute best for every one.

I disagree that external providers or ‘specialists’ are best equipped to fly in and help children deal with challenges. As adults, we are all specialists in living. We are all specialists in being mentally healthy, where we accept the World Health Organisation Definition of Mental Health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.”

A minority of children will need specialist support for an acute physical or mental health condition.
The majority need caring, positive adults who are solution-focused, aspirational and aware of how children grow and develop. And who work in partnership with the child’s parent or career to find the right path for him/her.

Some final thoughts:
We all need to be prepared to deliver pastoral care. A system which divides us into pastoral and curricular staff is inefficient.
We can’t be positive role models if we are worn out, demoralised and overworked.
We can’t run schools well if we don’t have enough adults in them to provide time, space and care.
We need a bit of slack in staffing so that if I am teaching French to a class of 27 and 26 of them are coping fine but one needs a bit of time out because his mum is ill/ his cat has died/ he feels angry/ he just needs to be listened to then someone can give him what he needs. This is early intervention.

This is not about class sizes per se but about the ratio of adults to children in an environment where life is happening and where positive relationships have the power to transform lives.

And I will finish with tweets from two very excellent people.

Let’s lead our schools like Chris Dyson:

C0403264-5AFF-42A4-92B9-8F281124EE54

 

And lead our lives like the fantastic Dr Mike Farqhuar:

A1837E11-3F25-4D36-B8BB-9C3D0B2FD75B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


TIL: getting Skype for Linux working⤴

from @ Sharing and learning

Microsoft’s Skype for Linux is a pain for Linux (well, for Ubuntu at least). It stopped working for me, no one could hear me.

Apparently it needs pulse audio to  work properly, but as others have found “most problems with the sound in Linux can be solved by removing PulseAudio”. The answer, as outlined in this post, is apulse “PulseAudio emulation for ALSA”.

The post TIL: getting Skype for Linux working appeared first on Sharing and learning.

School Values in Scotland⤴

from @ curriculum for equity

by Gary Walsh and Neil McLennan

Neil McLennan and I have been ‘speaking of values’ for a number of years now. We co-wrote a book entitled Speaking of Values with Dr Emma Fossey in 2016. The book is a series of interviews with various people in Scotland – leaders in the fields of education, business, social enterprise, the arts, youth activism, hospitality, medicine, and the Public and Third sectors – reflecting on the role of values in their lives and work.

On the back of that, we decided to try and learn some more about how values are understood and promoted in Scottish schools. The simplest way to do that seemed to be to ask teachers what their stated school values are, and to dig a little deeper to try and learn how the values had been identified and how they are defined. So we created a survey designed to do just that. It is a small-scale piece of work from which we can draw no firm conclusions: more robust research would be required to explore the issues in depth. The intention of creating the survey and sharing the results is to spark some further thought and dialogue, encouraging people in education to continue ‘speaking of values’ at a time when values couldn’t be more important. It seems entirely appropriate to be sharing the results in conjunction with World Values Day.

*The results presented here were collated up until 16th October 2017. The survey is still open and will run until 30th November 2017.*

This post does not offer a full analysis of the survey results – it presents the raw data gained so far and offers some thoughts by way of an initial conclusion. The survey responses suggest to us that there is a lot more to school values than what is written on school walls and websites. To borrow a recent quote from a Scottish teacher on Twitter, schools often try to ensure that values are “lived and not laminated”. The survey indicates that this is an attractive but ultimately extremely complex ambition.

Summary of survey results

As at 16th October 2017, approximately 45 teachers had submitted completed responses to the survey, covering a wide range of schools from across Scotland including primary, secondary, an independent school, state schools, non-denominational schools, faith schools, urban, rural, semi-rural and schools with specialist provision for additional support needs. School rolls varied from less than 10 to over 800, and schools were situated across all areas accounted for in the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation.

94% have a list of school values, with a small number saying they need to be reviewed. The most common school value was ‘respect’. Below is a word cloud that summarises the most popular words found in school statements associated with school values (taken from a combination of school values ‘lists’ and mission statements, provided by respondents).

How were your school values identified?

26 respondents (58%) said that their school values were identified “by consulting with various groups of people”.  3 respondents (7%) said they were identified by “teachers only”, 1 respondent (2%) said they were identified “by school management only”.

Who specifically contributed to the identification of your school values?

26 respondents (57%) indicated that “all pupils” contributed to the identification of school values, 8 (17%) said a “specific group of pupils” contributed (e.g. pupil council), 20 (43%) said all staff contributed, 9 (20%) said a specific group of staff contributed (e.g. management team or working group), 18 (39%) said all parents contributed, 9 (20%) said a specific group of parents contributed (e.g. parent council) and 10 (20%) said that members of the community contributed.

Respondents also said that other people involved in the identification of school values include former school captains, partner agencies and the local business community. Values were sometimes identified using a series of consultations that were later deciphered by teachers. 5 respondents commented that they did not know how values were decided, with 2 saying that the values had been decided before they started their role in the school.

How were the final values agreed upon?

17 (39%), the largest number of respondents, said that they did not know how the values were agreed. 2 (5%) respondents said that one person decided. 3 (7%) respondents said the values were agreed by vote. 16 (36%) respondents said that the values were agreed by group discussion. 4 (9%) said that the values were agreed using a survey or questionnaire.

2 respondents further explained that the final decision was made by staff during inservice days. 1 respondent said that the headteacher had the final say. 2 respondents said that the decision was made by pupil and parent councils, and 1 respondent said it was done during school assembly.

How often are your school values reviewed?

18 (40%), the largest number of respondents, said that they did not know how often school values are reviewed. 3 (7%) said they were reviewed every year, 4 (9%) said they were reviewed every two years and 7 (16%) said they were reviewed every three years.

1 respondent further explained that it depended on the number of new staff joining the school. 3 respondents indicated that a review tends to take place over longer timescales e.g. every 4/5 years, 5-10 years. 1 respondent said the values are never reviewed. 2 respondents explained that the values were new to the school and still being embedded.

Did you use any of the following policy documents when identifying your school values?

27 (66%), the largest number of respondents, said they used How Good is Our School when identifying school values. 21 (51%) said they used Curriculum for Excellence. 10 (24%) said they used the GTCS Professional Standards. 25 (61%) said they used GIRFEC.

3 respondents said they referred to UNICEF (Rights Respecting Schools) or UN values. 1 respondent said they referred to partner schools from around the world. 1 respondent indicated that, as the school is a community campus, the school consulted with the local Leisure Centre and Community Learning and Development services. 1 respondent indicated they will be using the policy documents listed above to help inform a vote on school values. Another respondent said they used HGIOS to identify “what we are good at”, and children were invited to contribute later at an assembly. 3 respondents said that they did not use policy documents. 1 respondent said they did not know.

Did you use any research frameworks or theories when identifying your school values?

21 (50%), the majority of respondents, said they did not use any research frameworks or theories. 8 (19%) said they did use research frameworks or theories.

6 respondents explained that they did not know whether research frameworks were used. 1 respondent said they used Growth Mindset theory. 1 respondent said they used the “hierarchy of childrens’ needs”. 1 respondent said they used “ethics and values led education”. 1 respondent said they would use the values element of their Into Headship programme.

Did you use any other tools, resources or points of reference when identifying your school values? (e.g. community artefact, website, book etc.)

16 (38%), the largest number of respondents, said they did not use any other tools. 9 (21%) said they did.

5 respondents said they looked at the values of other schools. 1 respondent further explained: “we talked with partner schools from Scotland/ Africa to discuss values which were important and why to those cultures and communities to help us develop a list”.

3 respondents said they referred to community values, with one explaining “During open days members of the community could put their thoughts down on posters. Parents and families voted” and another explaining “Our values are influenced by ex pupils and members of the community who have gone on to achieve and then visit the school to talk about their experiences”.

One respondent said they used “whole school challenges” to identify values, one said they referred to “Scottish values”, one said they referred to “Catholic values” and another said they referred to “values education theories”.

Is there an underlying theory regarding your school values? (e.g. ideas/principles regarding how they work or how they are best realised)

14 (36%), the largest number of respondents, said they don’t know if there is an underlying theory regarding school values. 9 (23%) said there is an underlying theory and 8 (21%) said there was not an underlying theory. Further comments received were as follows:

“Social constructivism, learning styles, emotional intelligence.”

“Again, not really a theory, but a belief that shared values form the basis of what the school community stands for and aspires to be. It is so important for staff to model these in day to day interactions in and out of the classroom and to refer to these as part of our Rights Respecting School agenda, our Five Pillars for Successful Learning and our ethos of the PB Factor – Personal Best.”

“If everyone in our school community (pupils, parents, staff) are involved in deciding the values then there is buy-in from all. This will mean they are most effective in impacting the ethos and direction of our school and ultimately in ensuring it is the best place for the children.”

“We looked at different values that were important and people chose the ones appropriate to our school.”

“From work in Values based education”

“RRSA and Girfec”

“We have a vision that our values will help the pupils and staff can attain and achieve all they can with and in the community”

In your opinion, are your school values visible and active in the daily life of your school?

22 (56%), the majority of respondents, said that school values are visible and active. 4 (10%) said they were not and 1 (3%) said they did not know. Further comments received as follows:

“Works in line with the classroom code for success and learning and teaching statements.”

“On the wall all around the school and discussed in school assembly fortnightly.”

“I refer to the core values when setting class tasks and also when a student may be unaware that they care challenging these values.”

“behaviour system, assemblies, possible new report card format”

“Most definitely. We make regular reference to our values through assembly, school newsletters, class discussions, parent engagement. Children, parents and staff are very aware of our values.”

“Some are, some less so. Some staff make reference to them, and some of the SLT use them in their communications. There are copies displayed in all teaching areas. Some staff do not explicitly refer to them. Pupils in general do not refer to them regularly.”

“Huge banner displaying our values outside the building, glossy posters of our values displayed in every classroom, regular assemblies delivered by SMT referring to values, values referred to regularly in staff meetings and CPD sessions. Values included in all teachers planning folders as point of reference. Values highlighted in school handbook and website, values included as banner on school letterhead.”

“The Vision and Values are embedded through regular references in assemblies, posters throughout the school, inclusion in pupil planners and references during vertical tutor time. In some subjects, projects can revolve around sharing and discussion of the vision and values.”

“On boards where they are seen daily by everyone in school. Referred to at assemblies and in classes”

“visible and on display, tied into behaviour policy and restorative conversations framework.”

In your opinion, how accurate are each of these statements?

Responses indicate that values are most commonly understood as dispositions: defined in the survey as “the attitudes, beliefs or norms we promote in our school”. Values are also commonly understood as relational (“they describe how we relate to one another and how we interact”), aspirational (“they describe or relate to the aims of our school”) and cultural (“they are the values of society that we uphold in our school”). It is noticeable that values are understood in various ways, with positive results for all categories provided in the survey, with the exception of values as absolute (“they are not open to change, exception or negotiation”). It is also noticeable that values are simultaneously understood in ways that might seem incompatible e.g. motivational and aspirational; rules and relative; personal, relational and cultural; intrinsic and extrinsic.

Have you got any further comments about your school values, or about this survey?

Comments received were as follows:

“We just updated these values in March 2017 and they were finalised in May 2017”

“We ‘reimagined’ our values and redesigned sharing to make more inclusive (dyslexic friendly etc) colour coded and visually graphic.”

“Our core values have been recently introduced this term and so it may take time for the school community to absorb them into our culture. However they hint at the work of Schwartz theory of basic values where our core values are universalism, benovolence, self direction and achievement.”

“As values are constantly under review they are adaptable to the needs of the school.”

“Brand new values for this academy session due to new HT, still implementing these into school life so hard to fully comment on impacts after only one term.”

“I think our school values are an ideal. I think policy can often conflict with our school values. I think that national, top-down policy implementation can directly challenge the reality of living by our school values. School management and middle leaders have the dilemma of reconciling our school values with implementation of policy from above.”

“Our values work is one of the most important pieces of work I have completed in school.”

“Resilience is a new value in our school and this has been promoted and developed through the Bounceback programme.”

“The previous question was hard to answer as our values are not yet clearly displayed and acknowledged in the school. They are referred to frequently but as general values not as specific school values.”

“The role of vision and values could be discussed further. However as a relative newcomer to the school I have observed that the values are part of the intrinsic ethos of the whole community”

“From thinking about these questions, there is more to school values than I had realised. Will look forward to exploring this further.”

“It took a long time for the working group to develop values that could help all but I think we did a good job. They have been in place for more than five years, they are used in restorative practice, in class management, between pupils and staff.”

“We are currently reviewing our values through an extensive consultation process”

Final thoughts

There are a number of possible explanations for the results in this survey, particularly the more nuanced responses that give a glimpse into the ways in which school values are interpreted by teachers. One of the most important factors is the limitations of the survey itself and the wording of questions and categories used.

Another explanation, however, could be a lack of understanding of values theory. The respondents in this survey said that values are most commonly understood as being dispositions. This is entirely fair given that educational discourse often says that we should be equipping pupils with certain values, particularly those that relate to responsible and active citizenship. However, the Schwarz Theory of Basic Values, for instance, indicates that values differ substantially from dispositions, attitudes, beliefs or norms. Instead, dispositions are underpinned by a combination of different values, and especially the ways in which values come into conflict. Dispositional characteristics “describe what people are like” but do not necessarily describe their values, understood as “what people consider important” (Schwarz 2012: 17). Similarly, Schwarz’s framework indicates that there can be a difference between values and the results of our actions e.g. an artist may be successful but may have been motivated by something like ‘a world of beauty’ or ‘meaning in life’, rather than being motivated by success or achievement itself. This could indicate that it would be perilous to allow a situation where the values driving education are too closely associated with instrumental views of success in a competitive job market.

This leads to another consideration that is mentioned in one of the final comments in the survey. One of the respondents said “I think our school values are an ideal. I think policy can often conflict with our school values. I think that national, top-down policy implementation can directly challenge the reality of living by our school values. School management and middle leaders have the dilemma of reconciling our school values with implementation of policy from above.” Perhaps this hints at the way in which educational policy has developed in recent years and the ways in which we understand the purposes of education. Since the 1970s in particular, educational policy in Scotland and other countries has been shaped by a conflict between the values of child-centred education and education driven by economic and social goals. This can leave teachers with the challenge of working in a situation where their capacity to act in accordance with professional values is threatened, distorted or limited by the values driving educational policy.

It may be of benefit therefore to bolster teachers’ ability to traverse these issues by developing a more in depth and shared understanding of values theory, the often implicit role that values play in the development of educational policy, the conflict between evidence-based and values-based education and the various positions on values education. It also seems important to explore the dangers of having an overtly behaviouristic approach to values in schools. The paper Research into Values in Secondary Education: A Report to the Gordon Cook Foundation recommends that pupils have an opportunity for a genuine exploration of values, which would involve the opportunity to challenge the values being espoused to them through critical analysis, democratic participation and activism. Are we ready to have that conversation, if it is not already happening? Making the effort to do so could help to further inform values-based practice and leadership in schools.

When we first began ‘Speaking of Values’ we never intended to impose any set of values of beliefs about the construct on others. Instead we wanted to delve deeper to understand the concept and better understand other people’s views. Indeed in our pre-publication discussions one person pointed out that in Scotland ‘we don’t tend to wear our values on our sleeves’. With that in mind there was something to be critiqued and explored. Exploration perhaps remains a key outcome for us and those who have taken part in this survey. For values do not stand still, they change with the time, people, influences and places we live and work in. Furthermore there would appear to be lots of scope for deeper exploration.  The survey itself could be only the starting point. But also the results perhaps indicate scope for deeper thinking and exploration of the construct.

With 57% of respondents saying all pupils were involved: what about the other 43% where not all pupils were involved? Which pupils were excluded, if indeed they were excluded? Why were they not involved?

39% responded said they don’t know how the school values are agreed upon. Does this say something about communication of the formation and finalising of values in schools or more about the individual and their awareness of the processes going on? Either way, there is more to explore here.

It was interesting to see what respondents said they used to stimulate thinking in formation and identification of values. In our survey, 66% said they used How Good Is Our School (HGIOS) to form school values. How Good Is Our School 4 (HGIOS4) references “values” 23 times, however it does not offer a wide overview of what values are or references to further exploratory works, nor does the General Teaching Council for Scotland (regulatory body for teachers) in the Standards for Career Long Professional Learning. This document references “values” 21 times. At present, GTCS frameworks are being revised and a deeper exploration of values might be worth considering as part of that process. Only 25% of respondents use GTCS standards when identifying values. Even from this we can see whilst this references values and the importance of them to the profession and schooling, this might not give any frameworks, philosophy, historic overview or further readings to support a deeper analysis and understanding of values. The same might be said for HGIOS.

Exactly half said they did not use any frameworks or other theories in their identification of values. It is especially striking that respondents strongly indicated they referred to policy documents to help identify school values but they also strongly indicated that they do not refer to values theory or research. This is concerning as it may limit teachers’ capacity to critically engage with values. It seems clear that we should not rely solely on policy documents to inform our understanding of educational values, especially when policy documents offer little or no in depth analysis.

We started our publication ‘Speaking of Values’ with an introduction to how the values on the Scottish Parliament mace came about. Those values are referenced in the HGIOS document along with an image of that mace: compassion, wisdom, justice and integrity. One might ask if these are indeed values. Furthermore, there is scope to consider how they were formed. The silversmith who made the mace chose the values by himself: he was given no briefing and there was no widespread consultation on what should appear on the mace. Donald Gillies questions whether this undermines the notion that Curriculum for Excellence is based on the principle of democracy.

Most striking perhaps was that only 56% think school values are ‘visible and active’. One teacher contacted us about the survey to say: ‘It would be interesting to talk values at our school- very strange imposed values (a number of them) they’re everywhere and blithely ignored by staff and pupils alike despite enormous managerial drive on them. Corporate values vs values and character of the school body.’

Our values should be an active, evolving exploration and we would hope this survey sparks further thinking and activity on this area which is ripe for more discussion. After all, we are promoting more Speaking Of Values.

Join the conversation online using #SpeakingOfValues


Sleep in the Park: 1000 Free School Tickets!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

This year Social Bite are bringing together 9,000 people in Princes Street Gardens, on the 9th of December, for the world’s largest ever Sleep-Out to try and end homelessness in Scotland for good. Participants will be joined by some of the world’s biggest artists to sleep in the cold for one night.
We have invited some amazing musicians to “busk” stripped back acoustics sets including Liam Gallagher, Deacon Blue, Amy Macdonald and Frightened Rabbit. We also have Rob Brydon hosting the event, Sir Bob Geldof sleeping out and John Cleese has agreed to come and read a bedtime story!

The website is: https://www.sleepinthepark.co.uk/
You can see a little video about the event here:

 Sleep In The Park Launch Video.mp4

Please note:  This allocation is for young people 16 and over and they must be accompanied by an adult.

Opportunity for Your School

Ordinarily, in order to participate in the event people have to pay an initial donation of £50 and commit to raise at least £50 more. However, we have had a wealthy individual donate £50,000 to fund the participation of 1,000 School kids (aged 16 and over).

Therefore I am writing to see if you would like to take an allocation of free tickets for children over 16 at your school. The group would need to commit to raising a minimum of £50 or more per person in order to take part, but would not have to pay any initial £50 registration fee as this has been entirely funded. They would also have to be accompanied to the event by a teacher(s).

We are giving the school ticket allocations out on a first come first served basis and we expect the demand to be high and the 1,000 available to be taken quickly. Therefore could you let me know if you would like an allocation of tickets? If so please let me know the number of tickets you would like for your school?

Josh Littlejohn MBE

Social Bite

Co-Founder

t: 0131 220 8206

 

We Must Do Better Than This⤴

from @ Just Trying to be Better Than Yesterday

(The original text of my article in TES Scotland 6th October 2017, adapted and developed from an earlier post of mine,)

The cup slams down on to the desk. Lukewarm coffee splashes onto the pile of documents I’ve yet to read. I don’t sit down in my chair, I collapse into it. The chair doesn’t invite me. I surprise it. In revenge, the wheels send me backwards into a cabinet. Three ring binders, piled precariously, fall to the ground. I can’t be certain but I’m sure my sighs can be heard in at least three adjacent classrooms. I stare at the ten e-mail requests I have received since the beginning of that last double period. This can’t be what it’s all about. It just can’t be.

‘What just happened there?’ should be the question most on my mind. ‘Why did that lesson go so badly?’ I should think about the endless planning I did for this lesson; the immaculate resources I prepared; the constructive yet essential use of ICT. The clear outcomes set, the challenging but achievable goals. Everything was perfect; it should have been perfect. And, of course, I should have been thinking about these questions. But I wasn’t. I had ten minutes to get ready for the next lesson. Another one I had planned for ages. I didn’t have time for questions.

That the rest of the day went well doesn’t really matter. They usually do. However, when I’m driving home, when I’m eating dinner, when I’m spending time with my wife discussing normal things, I know damn well I’ll be thinking about that lesson. I’ll be blaming myself and punishing myself and coming to the conclusion that I cannot and never will be able to be much good at this teaching thing. I’ll be back at my desk for the obligatory two or so hours of marking and preparation. I’ll be in school at 7.30 next morning to go through it all again.

Perhaps this portrays the reality of an impossible job. Perhaps it merely confirms the reality that you never stop learning. Reflecting on what goes wrong makes us stronger. However, nineteen years down the line I’ve finally arrived at the point where I know that, no matter how hard I’ve tried to get over it, that feeling never leaves you. Twenty four hours a day. I’ve dreamt of bad lessons, of troublesome students, of difficult colleagues. I’ve woken up at three in the morning worrying about course work. It never goes away.

I generally love my job. In all those years, there have rarely been days on which I wasn’t excited about getting into school. Recently though that has been a lot harder. The increasing awareness that the big and bold project that is Curriculum for Excellence is nothing but a pipe dream, crushed under the weight of poor implementation and bad decision-making; the inevitable new strategy added on to the pile of those we barely had time to implement last session; all added to a creeping feeling that, despite everything, nothing much has changed in Secondary School. We attempt to develop a Broad General Education from S1 to S3 without any real commitment to changing our timetabling structures. So we resort to what we know. Exams. The tail wagging the dog, once again.

We’re told things must change though.

The First of September was a quiet Friday, it seemed. Like many teachers, I’d been back a couple of weeks and just getting used to a new timetable and new classes. I might never have noticed it had I not been sent a link on Twitter, but there it was. Another major report released quietly on a Friday afternoon, lost in the maelstrom of the school day. The Teachers Workforce Planning for Scotland’s Schools document has much to discuss, much to debate.

The report suggests that – and as an English teacher I raised an eyebrow at this – new teachers, unless they wanted to teach English, wouldn’t require Higher English on entry to Teacher Education but at the point of exit. I wonder how this will go down with those who see TeachFirst as a way to attract ‘high quality’ graduates? Shouldn’t we expect high levels of Literacy to be in place when a student leaves school?

There were interesting comments on a return of the much-maligned Chartered Teacher Programme. Recognition that promoted posts were scarce and teachers were leaving, or planning to leave the profession, due to lack of opportunity, is important. However, there are many whose progress throughout the Chartered Teacher Scheme was curtailed last time round.

But that’s not really my concern for the moment. If you’re like me, you’ll sit through meetings about this and smile. ‘Of course, we’ll read that document. Of course, we’ll reflect and discuss the main points.’ Of course, we won’t, probably. I’ll add it to the workload document I didn’t have time to read, and the follow up report. That one is underneath the National Improvement Framework and Improvement Plan.

Oh, there are the new Literacy Outcomes that came out in June; the Education Governance Report that came out in June; the Delivering Excellence and Equity in Scottish Education Delivery Plan which also came out this year.

Excuse me while I slam my coffee cup down on the desk again.

You’d never guess from the media coverage, but we teachers are utterly fantastic at what we do. We teach kids to be better than they ever thought they could be, work harder than they ever thought they would. And we do it every day. Enough with the documents though. I’m like that drawer in your kitchen, full of carrier bags. You know it’s so crammed full that you can hardly open it but you keep cramming another one in now and again.

I want to get back to loving this again. There must be a better way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


OER 18 Keynote⤴

from

I’m absolutely delighted to have been invited by co-chairs Viv Rolfe and David Kernohan and the Association for Learning Technology to present one of the keynotes at the OER18 Conference in Bristol next year. The theme of the conference is Open for All and I’ll be talking about how we can engage students in open education, why we need policies to support OER, all wrapped up in a personal reflection of what openness means to me.

Opening OER16, CC BY SA 2.0, Anna Page.

We all have one conference which is our conference, the one event we never miss year after year, where we go to recharge and reconnect with our people. For me that conference has always been OER. I’ve never missed an OER conference and it’s been a real pleasure to see how the event has grown and developed over the years, under the careful guidance of ALT.   So it’s a real honour to be invited to present a keynote at OER 18, particularly as I’ll be following in the footsteps of so many inspirational women who have had such a profound influence on my own career as an open education practitioner; Maha Bali, Catherine Cronin, Josie Fraser, Melissa Highton, Sheila MacNeil to name just a few.

Thanks to everyone for all the enthusiastic and supportive messages on twitter yesterday, I’m on annual leave this week, so I missed the actual announcement!  As soon as I get back I’ll look for forward to talking to you all about what we as open educators can do to ensure that education really is Open for All.

 

The way we were⤴

from @ blethers

I've held off from saying much online about the latest celebrity-outing as a sexual predator, but the Harvey Weinstein furore has got me thinking about the past - my past. Interestingly enough, my first reaction was to reflect how it's always the really ugly, unattractive guys - just run over in your mind the names that surface and see if you agree. I can recall that time in the 1960s when I asked my mother how a man like Robert Boothby could attract anyone; I seem also to recall that her answer contained a reference to the aphrodisiac of power - the idea that a powerful man could always have his way with a younger partner. Clearly I was not entirely convinced of that; I do recall my 20-something self finding him utterly repulsive.

But actually that's not the whole story. The thing is, when we were young we were expected to be grateful to be fancied by ... well, by anyone. That's part of the sad truth. When I was in Primary 7 - that is, 11-12 years old - we read comics like Romeo (always had the lyrics of a current pop song on the back) and Valentine (had photo-serials instead of comic strip ones - I never liked it as much). The stories were always about a girl attracting some personable bloke by changing her hair or removing her specs, thereby looking more appealing and less brainy. There were columns devoted to pleasing a boy by allowing him to talk about himself - even down to the questions to ask him. And the girl always, always had to wait to be asked.

We joked about it too. There was a teacher in my secondary school whom we avoided as having "wandering hands". Remember that one? But then I remind myself that he was deeply unattractive. Would we have made the jokes about him if he'd been fanciable? There was the unknown man who chased me and two pals along the road, exposing himself as he did. We could hardly run for laughing - though the fact that we were encumbered with violins and (god help us) a cello didn't help. We were interviewed by a policewoman after that; one of my pals was the daughter of a high-ranking policeman. So they took it seriously - we didn't. Why was this?

Remember the cattle-market dances? Girls down one wall, boys facing? And then waiting to see if some pimply youth would ask you to dance, thereby sealing your fate? I went to about two of these: that was enough. And I was lucky. I had a very strict father who had been a secondary teacher all his life, and I'm eternally grateful for the way in which he restricted me and what I did. "Use me as an excuse if you like, he would say - you're not going." Until I was 18 and had passed all the Highers I needed for Uni, I wasn't allowed out to random parties. Imagine how much I hated him at the time, and how thankful I was each time I heard of what had happened at the parties I missed. I wasn't allowed to go hitch-hiking with my pals, nor on cheap, vaguely-planned holidays in Greece. So actually I was never assaulted on the deck of a Greek steamer in the middle of the night, nor on a hotel roof where it was cooler to sleep. And yes, these things happened.

But what of the life of a woman after she's left the protection of her family? (and I know some women aren't protected at all - I'm talking about myself, really) Someone else mentioned the oft-heard question: "Is he bothering you?" And we had to devise ways to avoid being "bothered". Remember, this can include a whole range of behaviours - the sudden hand on the thigh, the tongue down the throat when even a peck felt offensive, the lascivious wolf-whistle from some bloke down a hole in the road. And in the 60s we were never told that it was fine to tell the man what we really felt - rather the reverse. It was regarded as perverse to object to any of it. You made some excuse and wriggled out of the situation, or you let it go on and ended up raped. I was never raped, but I know people who were. They didn't call it rape; they euphemised the whole situation.

Where on earth am I going with all this? I think I'm looking at the sense of entitlement that men have had since time immemorial, and which the women of my generation hadn't climbed sufficiently out of the pit of submission that women had always lived in. So when I hear the current stories about the way famous men have been exposed for the promiscuous predators they are (and it's only famous men - the ordinary tosser in the street just goes on his ghastly way, presumably) - when I hear these, it's like hearing of people waking from a centuries'-long sleep and talking about their nightmares. But they are the nightmares on whose fringes I lived in my youth, and they feel familiar.

Even the best of men - and I'm fortunate: I know many such men - can't know this past as people women my age do. Can't know the present hell that too many women still inhabit. But it's not going to improve unless women occupy the confident upper ground that men have walked since they emerged from the slime; until all women feel the equal of any man they meet and bring up their sons to know this truth; until every girl is imbued with the powerful sense of self that circles her with the armour of confidence; until the Harvey Weinsteins of this world are slapped down the moment they show their true colours.

And until we can be sure that such men will never, ever, become the president of the most powerful nation in the world.


This sounds really interesting. I’ve not done much with she…⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

Scripting an Automated Solution by Aaron Davis
I am therefore thinking of creating a script in Sheets that collates all the links for the month in a Google Doc. To be honest, Google Apps Script is all still new to me, but I am wondering about the possibility of creating a template with merge fields. I remember Autocrat doing something similar. I could then use this to post in WordPress.

This sounds really interesting. I’ve not done much with sheet scripting other than copy the odd script. But I am wondering if you could still use a social bookmarking service, say pinboard, then use IMPORTFEED in your sheet to grab all the links, and descriptions . This might be easier than opening a google form every time you want to add a link? Or not YMMV.
But you could then automate the creation of the newsletter as you outline above. Pinboard would be goods as you can get a feed for a tag (newsletter).

Digital Nostalgia⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

I just opened my old 2001 iBook, running 10.3.9 (2005) with 320 MB of RAM. The  Finder was surprisingly snappy. It slowed down a bit once I had an application or two running.

In the dock (on the right had side, vertical) Graphic Converter, Safari, SuperCard, AppleWorks, Claris Emailer, Flash MX, Tex-edit-plus, terminal, NetNewsWire, IE, QuickTime, System Prefs and Classic. There are a few other fond memories in the Application Folder.

I couldn’t get it on the Wifi but it connected via Ethernet.

I was hoping to find out what podcasts I was listening to back then, but no luck, nothing in iTunes at all,  I think I cleared out it out at some point to pass on to my wife or daughter.

(My first mac was a performa 475 bought in 1996 just as the power pc macs appeared.)

Microcast 11: podcasting thoughts⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

A short podcast about my current thinking about and approach to podcasting.

i hope to be returning to microcasting more regularly.  This cast consists of a brief history of my podcasting and some musing on where it will go from now on.